Furry Cloud Cowl: free knitting pattern



Furry Cloud Cowl is here! Please, find a FREE knitting pattern below.
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

Materials:


Scheepjes River Washed (78% Cotton x 22% Acrylic, 50g/130m)
950 Wheaton x5 balls

Scheepjes Furry Tales (100% Polyester, 100g/57m)
Prince Charming 975 x3 balls

Furry Tales and Colour Crafter yarn  is available from local Scheepjes stockists and international retailers:

Wool Warehouse*, Black Sheep Wools* (UK, international shipping)
Caro’s Atelier* (NL and Europe)


US 2.5 (3mm) and US 11 (8mm) 16” (40 cm or longer) circular needles

Yarn needle to weave in ends

Gauge:


River Washed: 24 sts x 30 rows = 10cm/4” with cabled pattern on 3mm needles after blocking
Furry Tales: 8 sts x 12 rows = 10cm/4” with Stockinette stitch on 8mm needles.


Abbreviations:


CO: cast on
k: knit
p: purl
RS: right side
3/3 LC: slip next 3 stitches to cable needle and place at front of work, k3, then k3 from cable needle.
3/3 RC: slip next 3 stitches to cable needle and place at back of work, k3, then k3 from cable needle.
WS: wrong side

Size: approx. 30cm x 150cm

 

INSTRUCTIONS


Copyright. An original LillaBjörnCrochet Design (Tatsiana Kupryianchyk). Copyright 2014-2020. All rights reserved. This pattern is for personal use only. It cannot be sold, shared, republished (online and off-line), redistributed, translated without permission or edited in any way – in part or in a whole. Video tutorials for this pattern are not allowed. Please, always credit me as a designer. Thank you!

Cabled Top

With Scheepjes River Washed (Wheaton 950) and 3mm needles CO 73 sts.

Row 1 (RS): K5, p3, [k9, p3] x5, k5, turn – 73 sts
Row 2 and all WS rows: K8, [p9, k3] x5, k8, turn.
Row 3: Repeat row 1.
Row 5: K5, p3, [3/3 LC, k3, p3] x5, k5, turn.
Row 7: Repeat row 1.
Row 9: K5, p3, [k3, 3/3 RC, p3] x5, k5, turn.
Row 10: K8, [p9, k3] x5, k8, turn.

Repeat rows 3-10 until piece measures approx. 150cm. Then repeat rows 3-4 once more and fasten off loosely.

Furry Bottom

With Scheepjes Furry Tales (Prince Charming 975) and 8mm needles CO 25 sts.

Row 1 (RS): k25, turn.
Row 2 (WS): p25, turn.

Repeat rows 1-2 until piece measures approx. 150cm, then fasten off loosely.

Finishing

Sew Cabled Top and Furry Bottom along short edges shaping two cowls (be careful not to twist). Then place top and bottom facing each other with WS and sew both layers together along the edges using yarn needle and River Washed yarn – with mattress stitch. Weave in all tails.

Congratulations! Your Furry Cowl is now finished!
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.



P.s. Links marked with * are affiliate. If you make a purchase through these links I might be compensated with a tiny amount while you will not pay anything extra. Thank you for supporting my blog!








Sunny Blanket: make-a-long



It all started with a Sunny Border pattern, which was aimed to enlarge Sunny Mandala and turn it into a square. Laura Jackson (aka @taemombo on Ravelry and Instagram) was helping me with testing. But because Laura is always taking tests creatively and passionate, she decided to turn her Sunny Border into a blanket by adding small squares and Dandelion border around.
Garden Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: frozen-photo

Laura’s project became very popular. And although she posted general notes about how to put all three patterns together on her Ravelry project page, my inbox was still getting full with messages asking for a complete tutorial on how to make this blanket. And finally here it is!

You can find PDF with complete notes and directions HERE on my blog. It is available as a free download.
Garden Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: frozen-photo

Where to find Patterns:


Sunny blanket is a combination of three patterns: Sunny Mandala, Sunny Border and Dandelion Border. They are available in my shops on Ravelry and Etsy:

If you choose to purchase them on Ravelry, add all three patterns to your cart and use code SUNNY for 4.5 USD discount.

!! NOTE: Previous purchases will also count and you will not pay twice for any pattern. But please, note that if you purchased some of these patterns with a discount before, then your discount will be smaller now.

Material list:


~ 4mm crochet hook (used throughout the pattern)
~ Stitch markers, scissors, blocking tools, yarn needle to weave in ends
Garden Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: frozen-photo

Yarn:


Laura Jackson, Hilde Tindlund, Nina Mayer, Chuck and I have recreated Sunny blanket in several colorways to show you different variations. You can choose one of them or maybe get inspired and pick your own colors based on our small collection.

Each colorway was recreated with Scheepjes Stone Washed* and Scheepjes Colour Crafter* yarns. We have tried to choose similar colors so that both versions look almost the same.

Sunny blanket comes in four colorways. Please, note that yardages listed below are not official yarn packs. All three patterns are written in overlay crochet technique, with lots of front post stitches. And final yarn amounts will depend on your own crochet style and tension. The numbers listed below are based on the average yarn usage by testers. And a few numbers are given in the pattern to help you stay on track with the yarn. But please, be aware that you might need to add extra yarn in case your gauge is off.

Frozen Sun

Frozen Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: Laura Jackson


Stone Washed version:

C1 – 813 Amazonite x 6 balls
C2 – 814 Crystal Quartz x 8 balls
C3 – 809 Yellow Jasper x 6 balls
C4 – 802 Smokey Quartz x 5 balls
C5 – 805 Blue Apatite x 7 balls
C6 – 816 Coral x 6 balls
Frozen Sun. Colour Crafter version. Photo credit: Hilde Tindlund


Colour Crafter version:

C1 – 1820 Goes x 3 balls
C2 – 2019 Sint Niklaas x 3 balls
C3 – 1823 Coevorden x 3 balls
C4 – 1099 Wolvega x 2 balls
C5 – 1302 Dokkum x 3 balls
C6 – 1711 Leeuwarden x 3 balls

Moody Sun

Moody Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: Chuck

Stone Washed version:

C1 – 805 Blue Apatite x 6 balls
C2 – 829 Obsidian x 5 balls
C3 – 802 Smokey Quartz x 7 balls
C4 – 814 Crystal Quartz x 10 balls
C5 – 830 Lepidolite x 6 balls
C6 – 813 Amazonite x 4 balls

Colour Crafter version:

C1 – 1302 Dokkum x 3 balls
C2 – 1054 Haarlem x 2 balls
C3 – 1099 Wolvega x 3 balls
C4 – 2019 Sint Niklaas x 4 balls
C5 – 2007 Spa x 2 balls
C6 – 1820 Goes x 2 balls

Garden Sun

Garden Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: frozen-photo

Stone Washed version: 

C1 – 805 Blue Apatite x 7 balls
C2 – 807 Red Jasper x 4 balls
C3 – 816 Coral x 5 balls
C4 – 833 Beryl x 9 balls
C5 – 827 Peridot x 8 balls
C6 – 830 Lepidolite x 5 balls

Colour Crafter version:

C1 – 2005 Oostende x 3 balls
C2 – 1123 Roermond x 2 balls
C3 – 1711 Leeuwarden x 2 balls
C4 – 1114 Eindhoven (or 2004 Brussel) x 4 balls
C5 – 1822 Delfzijl x 3 balls
C6 – 2007 Spa x 2 balls

Evening Sun

Evening Sun. Colour Crafter version. Photo credit: Nina Mayer

Colour Crafter version only:

C1 – 1063 Rotterdam x 3 balls
C2 – 1005 Barneveld x 4 balls
C3 – 842 Taylor (Colour Crafter Velvet) x 2 balls
C4 – 1722 Alphen x 3 balls
C5 – 1723 Vlissingen x 3 balls
C6 – 1302 Dokkum x 2 balls

Stone Washed and Colour Crafter yarn is available from local Scheepjes stockists and also via international online retailers:

Wool Warehouse*, Black Sheep Wools* (UK with international shipping)
Caro’s Atelier* (NL and Europe)

If you are in Canada or US, make sure to check Laura’s shop Taemombo for ready yarn packs in all four colorways (with both versions). Laura is offering all three patterns for free for those customers who purchase a yarn pack from her to make a Sunny Blanket.
Garden Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: frozen-photo

Make-a-Long


If you’d like to make Sunny Blanket but not sure you can handle the patterns, or if you prefer to crochet large projects together with someone, I would like to invite you to my group on Facebook where an informal make-a-long for Sunny Blanket will be hosted.

We will begin on February 26th, 2020. There will be no strict dates and no rush. Because you will have all complete patterns at once, you can work at your own path and ask questions when you are stuck with the pattern. I hope this make-a-long will be a very relaxed one, and that it will also give you time to work on other wips at the same time (and I bet you have lots of them at the moment).
Frozen Sun. Stone Washed version. Photo credit: Laura Jackson

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.



P.s. Links marked with * are affiliate. If you make a purchase through these links I might be compensated with a tiny amount while you will not pay anything extra. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Furry Cloud Cowl: reveal



Hi there! We discussed different ways of knitting last week and came to the conclusion that whatever way you knit, it’s fine. If it works for you and if your stitches look right in the end. I decided to relax about my “weird” way of knitting. Especially after hearing that lots of other people successfully use it in the different parts of the world. Truly, there is no right or wrong knitting!
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

In a meanwhile, I have finished my Furry Cloud Cowl! These pictures arrived from Minsk, from my dear friends Oleg (photographer) and Natasha (model).

This winter in the Czech Republic is incredibly warm. We had a little bit of snow just once or twice, and it didn’t last for long. In Belarus there were just a few snowy days as well, and we were lucky to catch them in the pictures.
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

So here is my brand new Furry Cloud Cowl! A very simple knit with two layers: cables were knitted with Scheepjes River Washed yarn* (Wheaton (950) - 5 balls), and the bottom is straightforward stockinette fabric with Scheepjes Furry Tales yarn* (Prince Charming (975) - 3 balls).

As you can see in the pictures, my cowl is pretty long – approx. 150cm in length (30cm width), because I wanted it to be enough to double wrap around the neck. To make it very cozy and snuggly. This way you can even pull one wrap over the head, to make an improvised hood.
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

But it is very easy to make the cowl shorter, for just one wrap. All you need is to make both layers twice shorter. And you’ll need twice less yarn, obviously.

I chose a very simple knit pattern for the top. It consists of five 9-stitched braids. Easy to remember and meditative to knit.

And the bottom is just one fluffy cloud of 25 stitches. With large (8mm) needles and Furry Tales you won’t even notice when it will be finished! The fabric is growing in your hands very fast... And it also makes the cowl reversable!
Photo credit: Oleg Ignatovich

Free pattern will follow next week! So stay tuned.

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.



P.s. Links marked with * are affiliate. If you make a purchase through these links I might be compensated with a tiny amount while you will not pay anything extra. Thank you for supporting my blog!


Copenhagen Cardigan: crochet pattern



End of the year is the time to make resolutions and put some goals for the coming year. I haven’t put any strict goals or must-do-s for myself, as I know my creativity will bring me somewhere else anyway. But what I really want to accomplish this year is to design more crochet garments. My modest collection is slowly growing. And today I would like to introduce a new addition. Copenhagen Cardigan.
Photo credit to all pictures (except of the testers' work): www.frozen-photo.com

The pattern is available online on Etsy and Ravelry and is offered with 30% discount through the first release weekend (until Monday, January 27th, 2020). The pattern has been discounted already and the price you see is final, so no additional codes are needed.

This is the fifth garment design following Esja Sweater, Huldra Sweater, Fjell Cardigan and Metropolis Cardigan. Same as all previous designs, Copenhagen Cardigan is also worked top down without the seams. But this time I tried something new and used a raglan shape for sleeves.

Round yoked sweaters are very trendy and hot right now, but they don’t fit equally well everyone. And kind of “set-in”, “controlled” sleeves might be a better option for someone.

I should admit that designing a cardigan with shaped neck together with growing raglans and cabled mesh pattern on fronts was a bit of a designing struggle for me. But in the end I won this battle! And it’s proved by the fantastic testres’ work.

Copenhagen Cardigan is designed to fit with 4-10cm (2-4in) of positive ease at the bust. This cardigan is worked seamlessly from top down. First the raglan yoke is worked in rows to separation for body and sleeves. The lower body is worked in rows to bottom. Sleeves are worked top down to the cuffs. The length of the body and sleeves is easily adjustable.

I made two samples myself. One is long sleeved in a natural brown-ish color – cozy and casual. And another one is in deep blue with short sleeves – perfect as a summer version for warm days (if made with linen, cotton or bamboo yarns). And a nice fit for a dress, for example.

The name to Copenhagen Cardigan was given by the name of the shade I used for the very first (natural brown) sample. Have I ever shared my love for Scheepjes Metropolis yarn* with you? I’ve already used it once for Metropolis Cardigan last year, and I am pretty sure I’ll choose it again and again. Because this yarn is on top of my favourites.

Metropolis is 4ply yarn targeted as the sock yarn (it was released with the picture of socks hand knitted in all colors). It contains 75% Merino extra fine and 25% Nylon, but because it is very soft, in my opinion it is just great for knitted and crochet garments!

Not to mention 80 gorgeous heathered colors. Each of them contains 3 different shades which are blended together tastefully. I chose shades Copenhagen (066) and Cairo (070) for my samples. And my testers decided to crochet their cardigans with Metropolis yarn as well. Looky look at their color choices (just to be precise, some of the testers used stash yarn, and two cardigans were made with Scheepjes Bamboo Soft – a nice option for those with allergy to wool).

1. Sandra Veneman (size XL, Scheepjes Metropolis)
2. Esther Schippers (size 2X, Scheepjes Metropolis)
3. Elizabeth Kalka (size M, Scheepjes Bamboo Soft)
4. Loele van den Bergh (size S, Scheepjes Metropolis)
5. Laura Jackson (size S, Scheepjes Bamboo Soft)

1. Sarah Fabbri (size L, stash yarn)
2. Lisa Marlow (size S, Scheepjes Metropolis)
3. Faye Pike (size XL, Scheepjes Bamboo Soft)
4. Elizabeth Barraclough (size M, Scheepjes Metropolis)

If you’d like to have a look at all the shades of Metropolis yarn, check it in local Scheepjes shops worldwide, or via international online retailers:

WoolWarehouse*, Black Sheep Wools* (both in UK, international shipping)
Caro’s Atelier* (NL, Europe)
Taemombo* (Canada and US)

I’d say Copenhagen Cardigan is a classy design and everyday wearable. It has mesh decorative panels on both fronts with cables and lace. I first tried of lace and cables for Living Lagom shawl, and liked it very much.

I played with the stitch pattern a bit and used different stitches for front and back. Please, keep in mind that the pattern has two gauges and they should be very similar. If you fails to keep the same gauge for the front and the back, your fronts will be growing faster – good for the big bust owners  For the others, like me, longer fronts will result into a modern stylish fit.

And just to remind you, Copenhagen Cardigan pattern is available online on Etsy and Ravelry and is offered with 30% discount through the first release weekend (until Monday, January 27th, 2020).

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.

Creating a Cloud, or About Continental Russian Speed Knitting Style



If you ask me what I learnt first – knitting or crochet – I’ll have to think for a while. Because I honestly don’t remember. I know I learnt both crafts at nearly the same age, when I was 5 years old. But no idea what was first. I used to knit very much in the past, before one day I saw a picture of an overlay crochet mandala. And this is how my love affair with crochet restarted.


For the last 6 years I’ve been mostly designing crochet. Because it took a while to learn crochet terms in English, and the difference between the US and UK temrs. It also took a while to learn how to write a good crochet pattern. And it took a while to just get the hang of designing.

But in a meanwhile I was also doing knitting, now and then. And my new wip is also about knitting.
If you know me as a crochet designer, please, don’t worry. I won’t leave crochet and that will be my main designing stream. But sometimes it’s nice to have a little change. And also some yarns are asking for knitting. Like Scheepjes Furry Tales.

Not that it’s impossible to crochet with fur yarn – of course, you can absolutely do that, and I know that my fellow designers are working hard at the moment on new crochet fluffy projects. But I honestly think that knitting works a bit better for furry yarns, because it’s easier to see (or better to say “feel”) the stitches. And the better chances are you’ll stay on track with the stitch count.

So… my new design is about knitting. And do you know what I’ve figured out about my knitting recently? That I am an alien. “I am a little alien in the world of knitting”. This is what I discovered when I tried to follow English knitting patterns for the first time (as you may know, I am from Belarus. And I am using Russian language in my daily life. And of course I used to follow only Russian patterns in the past).

What I’ve discovered is that I purl in a very weird way. After purling the stitches appear to be placed differently on a needle for the next knit row. And instead of knitting them in front loops, as you would normally do, I have to knit them in the back loops.

Reverse purl and knit makes the knitted fabric look just normal. That’s why I have never questioned myself if I am doing this “right” or not.

I’ve recorded a short video with a gauge swatch for my new design to show you what I mean.


I was struggling to read knitting patterns in English, because some knitting terms didn’t work with my style – I had to reverse everything. But the charts work just fine, as I am making the same stitches as drawn in the charts but in my own way, without following the description.

And just a few days ago I occasionally saw a video on YouTube about “Continental Russian Speed Knitting”. And yay! This is exactly what I am doing. So obviously I am not the only one in the world. And this is probably how we all were taught to knit in the former USSR. You can actually search for more videos about Russian knitting style. There are lots of them out there.

After seeing the video I felt brave enough to share my knitting style with you. I thought maybe you would like it, and would decide to try. Because you make minimum movements with your fingers and wrists, this style is really speedy. And for me this is just the only way I can knit :)
 

P.s. And regarding my new design, it will be double-layered and reversible. With cables on top and fluffy cloud at the bottom. But you will have to wait a little bit to see the reveal!

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.




© LillaBjörn's Crochet World. Design by MangoBlogs.