Fade to Light Jacket MAL. Part 1: short rows



Hello and welcome to Part 1 of the Fade to Light Jacket make-a-long. Today we will talk about choosing the right size and short rows. Before you start working on this jacket, please, make an accurate gauge swatch first. You can find all details about yarn amounts and gauge HERE.
Fade to Light Jacket MAL

There are two options to follow make-a-long. You can either join it for free here on my blog: every Friday new portion of instructions will be published online. Or you can purchase a complete pattern in one print-friendly pdf file HERE on Ravelry or HERE on Etsy (both in English with US terms, and Dutch). Please, note that these files only include written instructions and no progress pictures.

Below you will find complete information about the pattern, including material list, abbreviations and pattern notes. And today we will start making the yoke – with short rows.

I have recorded a video for you explaining how to choose correct size for yourself and how to work short rows in crochet: both in theory and practice.


Hope you will have fun!

DUTCH translation is available HERE. Translated by Carmen Jorissen of New Leaf Designs

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Materials:


Yarn A: Scheepjes Whirl Fine Art (50% Superfine Merino, 25% Micro fibre, 25% Acrylic; 220g/460 m/503 yards)
Yarn B: Scheepjes Merino Soft (50% Superfine Merino, 25% Micro fibre, 25% Acrylic; 50g/105m/115 yards)

Note: depending on your gauge and crochet style you might need more yarn! For yarn amounts see Yarn Choice section

4.5mm crochet hook
Yarn needle to weave in tails, stitch markers or waste yarn, blocking tools

Find all yarn in your local Scheepjes shop, or purchase it online via international retailers:

Wool Warehouse* (UK, please check shipping guidelines before placing your order, as there might be limitations due to COVID situation)
Taemombo (US and Canada)

 

Sizes:


XXS (XS, S, M, L, XL, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X)

Finished bust circumference:
91.5 (99.5: 103.5: 109.5: 113.5: 121.5: 127.5: 131.5: 137.5: 145.5) cm
36 (39: 40.7: 43: 44.7: 47.8: 50.2: 51.8: 54: 57.3) in

Abbreviations (US crochet terms)


beg beginning
BOR beginning of the row/round
ch chain stitch
corr corresponding
inc increase
sc single crochet
sk skip
ss slip stitch
st(s) stitch(es)
sp(s) space(s)
yo yarn over the hook
pm place marker
prev previous
rm raglan marker
RS right side
WS wrong side

Special Stitches


SPsc (spike single crochet stitch): insert hook under ch1-sp from 2 rows below, yo, draw up a loop to the height of the current st, yo, pull through 2 loops.
(…) several stitches inside (…) made in one st

Pattern repeats:


[…] repeat instruction inside […] as many times as indicated in the pattern.
*…; rep instruction after * as many times as indicated in the pattern.

Gauge:


20 sts and 18 rows to 10 x 10cm (4 x 4in) using 4.5mm hook – slightly blocked.

Pattern for gauge (every sc and every ch1-sp counts as a stitch):

Row 1. Ch30, 1sc in second ch from hook, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] to end, turn – 29 sts
Row 2. Ch1 (doesn’t count as a st), 1sc, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] to end, turn.
Rows 3-25. Repeat Row 2.

Pattern notes:


Fade to Light Jacket is designed to fit with 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) of positive ease at the bust and 1.25-2 in (3-5 cm) of positive ease at the upper arm. The jacket is worked seamlessly from top down. First some short rows are worked back and forth to raise the back neck. Then the yoke with raglan increases is worked in rows to separation for body and sleeves. The lower body with mosaic pattern is worked in rows to bottom. Sleeves are worked top down. The length of the body and sleeves is easily adjustable.
Whirl Fine Art yarn

Yarn choice


Fade to Light Jacket pattern was designed especially for Scheepjes Whirl Fine Art and Merino Soft yarns. Use one Whirl cake for size XXS-S, choose between one or two Whirl cakes for size M, and two Whirls are recommended for sizes L-5X. The rest of the yarn is Merino Soft.

Alternatively, Fade to Light Jacket can be worked with Scheepjes Merino Soft Brush yarn instead of Whirl Fine Art: one Whirl is replaced with 5 skeins of Merino Brush (and two Whirls are replaced with 9 skeins of Merino Brush accordingly).

The yoke begins with Whirl and solid shade of Merino Soft is added later for the sleeves and mosaic lower body. You can either start working with light or dark tail of Whirl.

You will need 500 (550, 600, 620, 680, 740, 790, 840, 890, 940)g of yarn, or 1 (1, 1, 1(2), 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2) Whirl Fine Art cakes and 6 (7, 8, 8(4), 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) balls of Merino Soft


INSTRUCTIONS


Copyright! An original LillaBjörnCrochet Design (Tatsiana Kupryianchyk). Copyright 2014-2020. All rights reserved. This pattern is for personal use only. It cannot be sold, redistributed or edited in any way. Translations and video tutorials are not allowed. You can sell your finished products, but you cannot use my pictures to promote them. Please, always note me as a designer of this pattern. Thank you!


YOKE


To begin: With Yarn A. Ch92 (100: 100: 104: 112: 112: 124: 124: 124: 136) loosely.

Set up Row (WS):


Front: sc in second ch from hook, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] x9 (10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 13) times, ch1 (pm), sk next ch,

Sleeve: 1sc in next ch, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] x4 (4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7) times,

Back: ch1 (pm), sk next ch, 1sc in next ch, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] 15 (17, 17, 17, 19, 19, 21, 21, 21, 23) times, ch1 (pm), sk next ch,

Sleeve: 1sc in next ch, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] x4 (4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7) times,

Front: ch1 (pm), sk next ch, 1sc in next ch, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] to end, turn.

You’ll have one ch1-sp sp in every raglan seam (marked), 31 (35, 35, 35, 39, 39, 43, 43, 43, 47) sts for back, 19 (21, 21, 21, 23, 23, 25, 25, 25, 27) sts for each front and 9 (9, 9, 11, 11, 11, 13, 13, 13, 15) sts for each sleeve.
Set up row

SHORT ROWS (shaping back)


Common Note: Move raglan markers (rm) up to corr sps on next rows as you progress. For easy counting on short rows, mark same st as ss on the edge of every short row – use different color than raglan marker.

!IMPORTANT! If you are using two Whirls you’ll need to start alternating them on Short row 1 for a long gradient color change – find instructions in the pattern. Make sure that floats of yarn stay on WS.

TIP: Because fabric is reversible, it might be helpful to mark RS with waste yarn.

Short row 1 (inc for back and sleeves)


Back: RS. Ch1 (doesn’t count as a st here and throughout), 1sc in first sc, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc in next st] x22 (24, 24, 25, 27, 27, 30, 30, 30, 33) times, ch1 (mark as BOR – use different color! Change to another Whirl for two Whirls option), sk next sp, 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc in next st] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk next sp,

Sleeve, Back, Sleeve: (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x1 (1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3) times, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on WS side, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until BOR (move rm to corr sp), ch1 (pm for BOR, change to another Whirl for 2 Whirl option), 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc in next st] until last sp and sc left before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x1 (1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3) times, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on RS, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until BOR.

You’ll have one ch1-sp sp in every raglan seam (marked), 35 (39, 39, 39, 43, 43, 47, 47, 47, 51) sts for back, 19 (21, 21, 21, 23, 23, 25, 25, 25, 27) sts for each front and 11 (11, 11, 13, 13, 13, 15, 15, 15, 17) sts for each sleeve.
Use marker of a different color for BOR (beginning of the row)
Move raglan markers to corresponding spaces as you progress
Increases before and after raglan marker

Short row 2 (inc for back and front only!)


Back: ch1 (change to another Whirl for two Whirls option, pm for BOR), sk sp, 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk sp,

Sleeve: 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until next rm making sc in same st as ss when you reach it,

Front, Sleeve, Back: ch1 (pm), sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x1 (1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3) times, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on WS, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until BOR, ch1 (pm for BOR), sk sp, 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk next sp,

Sleeve: 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until next rm making sc in same st as ss when you reach it,

Front, Sleeve, Back: ch1 (pm), sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x1 (1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3) times, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on RS, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until BOR .

You’ll have one ch1-sp sp in every raglan seam (marked), 39 (43, 43, 43, 47, 47, 51, 51, 51, 55) sts for back, 21 (23, 23, 23, 25, 25, 27, 27, 27, 29) sts for each front and 11 (11, 11, 13, 13, 13, 15, 15, 15, 17) sts for each sleeve.
Change to another Whirl for two Whirls option

Work into the same stitch as slip stitch (when you reach it)

Short row 3 (inc for body and sleeves)


Back: ch1 (change to another Whirl for two Whirl option, pm for BOR), sk sp, 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk sp,

Sleeve: (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st,

Front, Sleeve, Back: ch1 (pm), sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5) times making sc in same st as ss when you reach it, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on WS, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until BOR, ch1 (pm for BOR), sk sp, 1sc in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, ch1 (pm), sk next sp,

Sleeve: (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] until last sp and sc before next rm, ch1, sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st,

Front, Sleeve, Back: ch1 (pm), sk sp, (1sc, ch1, 1sc) in next st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] x3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5) times making sc in same st as ss when you reach it, ch1, sk sp, 1ss in next sc, turn and continue on RS, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] across rest of sts all the way to the left front making sc in same st as ss when you reach them.

Remove BOR and short rows markers; raglan markers should stay in their place.

Next row - WS: Ch1, 1sc in first st, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] across making sc in same st as ss when you reach them and moving rm to corr sps.

You’ll have one ch1-sp sp in every raglan seam (marked), 43 (47, 47, 47, 51, 51, 55, 55, 55, 59) sts for back, 23 (25, 25, 25, 27, 27, 29, 29, 29, 31) sts for each front and 15 (15, 15, 17, 17, 17, 19, 19, 19, 21) sts for each sleeve.

That's everything for today. See you next week, and we will continue with raglan increases.
 
You can purchase a complete pattern in one print-friendly pdf file HERE on Ravelry or HERE on Etsy (both in English with US terms, and Dutch). Please, note that these files only include written instructions and no progress pictures. 

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Fade to Light Jacket MAL: gauge information



Hello and welcome to the Fade to Light Jacket make-a-long (MAL). Today we’ll talk about the gauge and its importance in crochet garments. First bit of instructions will follow later this week. If you haven’t seen Fade to Light Jacket, please check this blog post full of reveal pictures and general information about sizing and yarn requirements. For translation to other languages, please use a Translate button on this blog.

As you might already know, Fade to Light Jacket MAL is about making a top down crochet garment with raglan sleeves. Every crochet pattern, regardless of its shape or kind, always has a listed gauge (or tension). The gauge gives you an idea of how many stitches and rows match in 10 cm/4 in. In other words it gives you an idea of the size.

In fact the gauge is important for every project: whether it’s a shawl or a blanket. But if you can skip it making a pillow, for example, for crochet garments the gauge is the most important bit.

Why? Because garment pattern instructions are always written for certain yarn weight, hook size, and gauge.

If you choose to live dangerously and don’t make a gauge swatch for your Fade to Light Jacket, you risk ending up with a totally different size than you meant to choose.

If you have less or more stitches/rows in 10 cm/4 in, your jacket will become bigger or smaller. And as a result, it won’t fit you.

PLEASE! Before you start making your Fade to Light Jacket, first make a gauge swatch.

The stitch pattern is very simple: only single crochet stitches and chains are used here (US crochet terms). And every sc and chain-space (a “small hole”), counts as a stitch.

Usually the patterns list the gauge before blocking. The gauge for Fade to Light Jacket is given after a slight block (you can stretch your gauge swatch with hands a little, but don’t pull it too much, as it will destroy the stitches).

What is interesting about Scheepjes Whirl Fine Art and Merino Soft yarns – they are quite stretchy. When you work your gauge swatch, don’t make it tight, as after blocking it will shrink back. It means that your gauge swatch before and after blocking will stay almost the same. So work it in a relaxed way, change to a bigger hook if needed. The stitches should look neat: not too loose, and not too tight.

I have made a short video where I am talking about the yarns and gauge for Fade to Light Jacket MAL:

The gauge for Fade to Light Jacket is 20 sts and 18 rows to 10 x 10cm (4 x 4in) using 4.5mm hook. Here is the stitch pattern for your gauge swatch (every sc and every ch1-sp counts as a stitch):

Row 1. Ch30, 1sc in second ch from hook, [ch1, sk next ch, 1sc in next ch] to end, turn – 29 sts
Row 2. Ch1 (doesn’t count as a st), 1sc, [ch1, sk sp, 1sc] to end, turn.
Rows 3-25. Repeat Row 2.

Dutch below:

Stekenverhouding: 20 stn en 18 rijen meten 10 x 10 cm met 4,5 mm haaknaald – licht opgespannen. Patroon voor stekenverhouding (elke v en elke 1l-open telt als s):

Rij 1. 30l, 1v in 2e l vanaf naald, [1l, volg l oversl, 1v in volg l] tot eind, keer – 29 stn
Rij 2. 1l (doesn’t count as a st), 1v, [1l, open oversl, 1v] tot eind, keer.
Rijen 3-25. Herhaal Rij 2.

After 25 rows, your gauge swatch will be bigger than 10cm/4”. Take a ruler or measuring tape and measure your gauge in the middle of your gauge swatch. Don’t forget that every space counts as a stitch as well.

Success! :) See you on Friday. We will begin crocheting our Fade to Light Jacket. And I will show you how to make short rows.

Just to remind that general information about Fade to Light Jacket MAL is available HERE.

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Fade to Light Jacket make-a-long: Reveal



Have you ever made a crochet garment? Or have you ever thought about making one but you are afraid it won’t work because you have been crocheting blankets and shawls all your life? New make-a-long (MAL) might help you to overcome your fears and enter the exciting world of crochet sweaters and cardigans.
Crochet jacket with raglan sleeves

The idea of free MAL about creating a top down garment have been growing in my head for a very long time. For two years at least. Every time I release a new crochet sweater, I can hear and see comments from people doubting they can handle the pattern. And I can understand the fears. If you have never made a garment before, it might be scary to dive into the short rows, yoke increases, shaping and adjusting to your own needs. And I decided to design a simple raglan jacket to show you all steps - slowly, with progress pictures and explaining every tiny bit.

Colors used for a jacket above are Whirl Fine Art 650 Minimalism and Merino Soft 601 Pollock.

Fade to Light Jacket is designed to fit with 4-6" (10-15 cm) of positive ease at the bust and 1.25-2" (3-5 cm) of positive ease at the upper arm. The jacket is worked seamlessly from top down. First some short rows are worked back and forth to raise the back neck. Then the yoke with raglan increases is worked in rows to separation for body and sleeves. The lower body with mosaic pattern is worked in rows to bottom. Sleeves are worked top down. The length of the body and sleeves is easily adjustable.


Sizing


The jacket pattern is written for ten (!!) sizes: XXS (XS, S, M, L, XL, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X) with finished bust circumference: 91.5 (99.5: 103.5: 109.5: 113.5: 121.5: 127.5: 131.5: 137.5: 145.5) cm/ 36 (39: 40.7: 43: 44.7: 47.8: 50.2: 51.8: 54: 57.3)

To choose the size you need, please measure you bust at the widest point and add 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) for ease. Then see the numbers above and choose the closest size. If your measurement is in-between the sizes choose either a smaller one (if you want a more fitted look) or a bigger size (for an oversized fit).

In the picture below I am wearing size M while my actual size is S. So the jacket is slightly roomy for me, which I like. The colors for sample below are Whirl Fine Art 651 Impressionism and Merino Soft 655 Chagall.
Crochet jacket with a slightly oversized bit


Yarn choice


Fade to Light Jacket pattern was designed exclusively for Scheepjes Whirl Fine Art and Merino Soft yarns. Use one Whirl cake for size XXS-S, choose between one or two Whirl cakes for size M, and two Whirls are recommended for sizes L-5X. The rest of the yarn is Merino Soft.

With one Whirl cake you will get a faster color change for the yoke, and a complete fade of two colors in the mosaic pattern of the lower body. The sleeves will be solid. And with two Whirls for smaller sizes (M and L) the sleeves will get a long fade of colors (see picture above). Larger sizes will be something in between: half faded and half solid sleeves.

Here are examples for your inspiration.

Sandra Veneman (size L, two Whirls: Whirl Fine Art 654 Cubism and Merino Soft 609 Rembrandt)
Fade to Light Jacket by Sandra Veneman
Photo credit: Sandra Veneman

Esther Schippers (size 2X, two Whirls: Whirl Fine Art 657 Renaissance and Merino Soft 650 Velazquez)
Fade to Light Jacket by Esther Schippers
Photo credit: Esther Schippers

Alternatively, Fade to Light Jacket can be worked with Scheepjes Merino Soft Brush yarn instead of Whirl Fine Art: one Whirl is replaced with 5 skeins of Merino Brush (and two Whirls are replaced with 9 skeins of Merino Brush accordingly).

The yoke begins with Whirl and solid shade of Merino Soft is added later for the sleeves and mosaic lower body. You can either start working with light or dark tail of Whirl.

Laura Jackson made her jacket with both Merino Soft and Merino Soft Brush colors in size XS (Merino Soft 605 Hogarth and Merino Soft Brush 252 Toorop). She also added a tiny mosaic detail to the sleeves. Check details on her Ravelry page.
Fade to Light Jacket by Laura Jackson
Photo credit: Laura Jackson

And here is my version with Merino Soft 607 Braque and Merino Brush 257 Van der Leck (size M). I went for a ¾ sleeves for this one and also added a mosaic detail for the cuffs.
With Merino Soft and Merino Soft Brush yarns by Scheepjes

The pattern will give two options for the front bands: either for a clasp (without button holes) or with buttons. You can choose what you like better.

If you search for color inspiration, have a look at the image below.

Complete yarn amounts:


You will need 500 (550, 600, 620, 680, 740, 790, 840, 890, 940)g of yarn,
or 1 (1, 1, 1(2), 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2) Whirl Fine Art cakes
and 6 (7, 8, 8(4), 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) balls of Merino Soft.

*Please, note that yarn amounts are approximate. They were estimated for specific measurements: length of the lower body from underarm approx. 35.5cm/14". If you want to make your jacket longer, you will need more yarn*

Find all yarn in your local Scheepjes shop, or purchase it online via international retailers:

Wool Warehouse* (UK, please check shipping guidelines before placing your order, as there might be limitations due to COVID situation)
Taemombo (US and Canada)
How to make a crochet garment

What you will learn during MAL:


  • How to choose correct size for yourself
  • What short rows mean and how they are done
  • How to shape yoke with raglan increases
  • How to adjust yoke/jacket for your own body
  • How to add (correctly) button and buttonhole bands

Fade to Light Jacket Timeline:


Reveal (this post) – July 17th, 2020
General information and gauge swatch – August 4th, 2020
Part 1: short rows – August 7th, 2020
Part 2: raglan increases – August 14th, 2020
Part 3: sleeves and mosaic pattern for lower body – August 21st, 2020
Part 4: button bands and finishing – August 28th, 2020

See you there? :)

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New Life for a Mandala with Flower pattern – overlay crochet



Overlay crochet is something that brought me to the world of crochet design 6 years ago. I clearly remember how it started. Despite being crocheting and knitting for as long as I remember myself, writing down the patterns was never either my plan or goal. But life had its own plan for me.

Back in 2014 I first came to Etsy and started browsing crochet projects for an inspiration. And one of them was overlay mandala designed by Carola Herbst of CAROcreated. It was love from the first glance. I had to zoom in the picture to see how the stitches were placed. And could not understand anything.

Later I bought several overlay crochet patterns to learn the technique. I found out that this technique was first introduced by Melody McDuffee back in 2003. I bet textured crochet like this existed before, but Melody was the first crafter who put everything together in a complete concept.

I studied different patterns and played with yarn. And I even managed to sell several mandalas via my newly created shop on Etsy. After a few months of training I felt confident myself to try and design something on my own. And who knows – maybe even to write the pattern down. My first overlay mandalas looked very similar to already existing samples, and I never wrote patterns for them. And then Mandala with Flower was created. My first “adult”, if I can say like this, crochet pattern.

If you would like to learn more about overlay crochet, please, check my blog HERE. I have collected technique basics and tips and tricks which will help you to understand the concept of overlay crochet.

Mandala with Flower was released as a stand-alone pattern a few years ago. The central flower has a very simple shape with eight petals, and can be used either as a wall hanging, or table decoration, or as an appliqué for your old pillow case for example.

Later I experimented with the border and designed an extension which was never released. Adding instructions for the border was on my to-do list for all last 6 years, and finally I made space in-between new releases to come back to it.

And… It’s here! The entire pattern was rewritten, and a new photo-tutorial was added. Now Mandala with Flower pattern is available together with extension instructions in my Etsy HERE and Ravelry HERE shops. If you bought the pattern previously, please come back to your downloads and get a new copy. Or you can newly buy the pattern with 20% discount through this weekend (through Monday, July 13th, 2020).

Like for any other overlay mandala, you can use any yarn from your stash. My Mandala with Flower was recreated with DK yarn in original colors (luckily I still had them in my stash). It’s a mix of different brands, and because no labels were saved, I cannot tell you exact names and numbers of colors. I can only say I used beige, orange, dark chocolate, light teal and blue.

With DK yarn and 3.5 mm hook my mandala measures approx. 70 cm/27.5” across. With larger yarn and hook (worsted or even Aran) it will be bigger obviously and will make a nicely sized rug.

Have a look at mandalas finished by our wonderful testers team. Aren’t they inspiring?

Laura Jackson (@taemombo) and Sandra Veneman (@happybee) decided to square up their Mandalas with Flower using corners from Sunny Border pattern. Am I the only one or do you also see the beginning of beautiful blankets here?
Photo credit: Laura Jackson

Photo credit: Sandra Veneman

Just to remind, Mandala with Flower overlay crochet pattern is available on Etsy HERE and Ravelry HERE with 20% discount though Monday, July 13th, 2020. The price was already discounted and you don’t need to apply any codes. Hope you enjoy!

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Coral Story Blanket: with love to brioche crochet



Brioche crochet is one of my (many!) favorite techniques. I am literally obsessed with brioche at the moment. And more I am using it, more I am amazed at how natural it is for shaping. My love affair with brioche crochet started a few years ago. First I tried it as a part of overlay technique, then I began looking for a way to make fabric more draping. I used it for my latest Brioche Lane Sweater design. And today I am very excited to introduce something new.
Add this pattern to your Ravelry Queue

Please, welcome – my Coral Story Blanket (credit for a fabulous name goes to my lovely husband; that was he who noticed similarities in the stitch pattern with coral’s shapes. By the way he also said that wrong side of this blanket looks like Starry Night by Van Gogh – but that’s another story…)

To celebrate release, Coral Story Blanket pattern is available with 20% discount on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE - through Monday, June 1st, 2020. The price you see is final, and no codes are needed. Just add the pattern to your cart and enjoy.

Coral Story Blanket is one of those designs which grow very fast and straightforward. I’ve been growing an idea of brioche mandala for a while now, but in the end it became a cute hexagon. Which then transformed into a blanket.

The pattern includes two motifs – full brioche hexagon and a kind of “solid” one for adding interest to the texture (credit for this idea goes to my everyday muse Laura Jackson of @taemombo). And then half hexagons were created to fill the gaps along the edges and polish the blanket’s shape.

My blanket is approx. 135 x 145 cm large, but you can easily make it bigger by adding two more rows of motifs and/or rearranging them differently. The pattern includes yarn amounts for each motif, and it should be easy to calculate final yardages. Just don't forget to order something extra for join and border.

Coral Story Blanket is not only about stitch pattern but also about the colors and their changes. I chose Scheepjes Our Tribe yarn for my sample. And I am curious if you can recognize this color palette… It’s actually a copy of Rozeta Twilight colorway! Looks a bit different in a new design, but the play of colors is equally gorgeous.

You will find Our Tribe yarn in your local Scheepjes shops, or via online retailers:
Wool Warehouse*, Black Sheep Wools* (both in UK with international shipping; please note that shipping might be limited in times of COVID-19 worldwide quarantine);
Caro’s Atelier* (NL and Europe)
Taemombo* (US and Canada)

Our Tribe yarn with its softness and amazing gradual changes of colors is just perfect for this blanket.

If you are looking for alternative yarns, please pick something very light and soft. Brioche crochet is a “yarn eating” technique. And with wrong yarn your blanket might become stiff and heavy. So yarns with soft content and generous yardages are recommended… For another blanket I would probably look into combination of Scheepjes Whirls and Whirlettes

Four different colors were used for my blanket: Iris Garden as main color (x8 skeins), and one skeins in each of three contrast colors: Felted Button, Miss Neriss and Haak Maar Raak. You might say I am lazy in not thinking about new colorways, but honestly – I am simply in love with Rozeta Twilight colors! Such a gentle rainbow across the night sky (or colorful coral colony in deep ocean).

If you are wondering about other color options, please, have a look at small samples made by my wonderful tester’s team: Sarah Fabbri, Jenna Bowers, Macarena Marskell, Lisa Marlow, Pam Hibbert, Loele van den Bergh, Elizabeth Kalka.

And here is another sample created by Laura Jackson. She decided to make fewer motifs and arrange them into hexagons. Small triangles were added to fill into the sides. And obviously, Laura used less yarn for her blanket. Check all details about her project HERE on Ravelry.
Photo credit: Laura Jackson

I should probably give a short introduction into brioche crochet, just in case you feel unsure about your crochet level while looking at pictures here. Brioche crochet IS EASY to do. And it uses basic simple crochet stitches. You will be making lots of front post stitches and chains. Only one color is used for each round, and there is no yarn cutting and weaving in hundreds of tails. 

The pattern is building itself. Very naturally. And you only need to be attentive while placing your stitches. A heavy photo-tutorial is waiting for you in the pattern showing each round. So honestly, there is nothing to worry about.

And here is how the wrong side looks, in case you are wondering... That's my husband's Starry Night :)

Just pick a bigger hook than you would normally use for your yarn, and try to crochet in a relaxed way not pulling and tightening your stitches. You want a soft and airy fabric.

Do you feel inspired to try brioche crochet? Grab the pattern of Coral Story Blanket and give it a try!

Just to remind you, the pattern is on SALE through Monday, June 1st, 2020 both on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE with 20% off. Enjoy!

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