Brioche crochet: masterclass



Brioche is a big thing in the knitting world. If you make a quick search, you will find lots of garments, shawls, and accessories with intricate curved stitch patterns. There is a complete concept of doing brioche in knitting. You have exact rules of how to place the stitches, change colors, make increases, and shape the lines. Crochet does not have all those possibilities, yet there are still some means and techniques to achieve the brioche look. 


Introduction to Brioche crochet 

The Wikipedia defines brioche knitting like “a family of knitting patterns involving tucked stitches, i.e., yarn overs that are knitted together with a slipped stitch from the previous row. Such stitches may also be made by knitting into the row below (equivalent to the slipped stitch) and dropping the stitch above (equivalent to the yarn over). The tucked stitches may form a second layer of knitting in front of the first layer, resembling an array of arches or (seen upside-down) of fish scales.” 

And apparently, we can achieve the same effect in crochet. 

I have been developing brioche crochet for several years now. I have started with an overlay mandala is just two colors to imitate the brioche look. Then a few other projects were designed for working in the rounds and rows with chain-spaces. For a so-called airy version of brioche.

Here are examples of my brioche work: Brioche Waves blanket (and cowl), Coral Story Blanket, Alma Sweater, Helios Mandala. And Graphite Mandala is an example of a thick brioche (or, overlay version). All these patterns are available with 25% off through Monday, June 28th, 2021. Please use code BRIOCHE at the check-out.

And you can purchase a masterclass for Brioche crochet from Patterns by Lilla Bjorn website HERE. The e-book includes ready-to-print information from this blog post with extended video tutorial on how to work brioche crochet in rows (and change colors), a complete pattern for the Brioche chair pad (see picture below) with step-by-step pictures and video tutorial for the first six rounds. And additionally, you will receive patterns for the Brioche Heart and Brioche Infinity pillow. All in one printable file without the ads.

Characteristics of Brioche Crochet 

Like knitting, brioche crochet is in fact a ribbing made with front post stitches and chains. Usually, we work with just two colors using one color per round. The rounds can be worked either on the right side, or with alternation of right and wrong sides to prevent stitches from leaning. If the pattern uses rounds on the wrong side, we should work back post stitches instead of front post ones. 

The first two rows or rounds in brioche crochet are usually worked with double crochet (dc – US terms). And on the third row/round we start working with front/back post stitches. Here are two videos showing two set-up rows and how to work front/back post stitches in brioche crochet (I say rounds in the video - sorry, too excited :)

The stitch pattern appears on the right side (so we only see the front post stitches on the right side). And the wrong side appears to be striped with just chain spaces. 

Because the fabric consists of two layers, it is quite thick. That is the reason why fine and soft yarns are recommended for brioche crochet, together with a bigger hook than you would normally use for this yarn. And because we work with a larger hook, the yarn should have a bit of a natural fluff to fill the holes. Alternatively, you can use two different yarns with the same weight, one of which has fluff. 

In my brioche work I am using the following Scheepjes yarns: Our Tribe, Metropolis (with two solid shades or in combination with Spirit). 

The front post stitches are always worked on the right side in front of chains and around of stitches of the same color below (unless otherwise instructed). So basically, we are building long curved cables. 

Special stitches and abbreviations (US crochet terms) 

To achieve an intricate brioche stitch pattern, we need to build increases and decreases. An increase is usually worked as two front post stitches around the same stitch below – with ch2-between: (FPdc, ch2, FPdc) around the next stitch. Here is a video showing an increase.

Those two front post stitches form a V-shape. And on the next round, a brioche double crochet (brdc) is worked into this V. Brdc is a regular dc placed into a ch2-space from two rounds below in front of the chains from the previous round. Here is a video showing how to work brdc.

In some places, two brdc with ch2 worked into the same V will form an increase as well. 

And decreases in brioche crochet are usually front post double or treble two together crochet stitches (FPdc2tog or FPtr2tog). They are always worked around two stitches of the same color below, and the stitch of different color between them is skipped. Here is a video showing a decrease.

Try your hand in brioche crochet with these three patterns: Brioche heart, Brioche infinity pillow and Brioche chair pad which is exclusively available as a part of an e-book via Patterns by Lilla Bjorn website HERE. This ready-to-print e-book includes all three patterns and a complete masterclass on brioche crochet from this blog post, without ads. You will also receive a link to a video on how to work brioche crochet in rows and change the colors, and also a video tutorial for the first six rounds of the Brioche chair pad. 

Hope you enjoy!

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.

Vilia Mosaic Sweater



Do you like mosaic crochet as much as I do? I hope you do because I have something exciting to share with you today. My mosaic adventures started back in 2017 with Nya blanket, and since then I was coming back to this simple yet effective technique. And today I am happy to introduce my new design – a Vilia Sweater. 


DISCLOSURE: Photography by @ell_photographer_, photo edit by @vitali_frozen

Mosaic crochet has become hugely popular over the last few years. And today it has two main directions: overlay and inset. Overlay mosaic projects are worked on the right side only in back loops, and long stitches are added on top of the background. And inset crochet uses chains, so mosaic stitches are kind of incorporated into the background for the feel of one layer. And chains add extra air and lightness to the crochet fabric. 

The Vilia Sweater pattern is available on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE with a 25% off through Monday, May 31st, 2021. The price is discounted already, and no codes are needed.

The pattern is written in English with US crochet terms, and it contains row-by-row written instructions, mosaic chart and photo-tutorial.

Vilia Sweater uses inset mosaic technique, which I believe works best for the summer garments. Made with fine cotton blend fingering yarn (Scheepjes Whirlette in my case), it is super light and drapey. 

The sweater is designed to fit with 2-4 in (5-10 cm) of positive ease at the bust and 1 ½ - 2 in (4-5 cm) of positive ease at the upper arm. It has a boxy fit for the body with slim sleeves, however both the body’s and sleeves’ width are easily adjustable, as the sweater is worked seamlessly from top down.

First some short rows are worked back and forth to raise the back neck. Then the yoke with mosaic pattern on the front is worked in rounds to the separation point for body and sleeves. The lower body is worked in rounds to the bottom. Sleeves are worked top down to the cuffs. The length of the body and sleeves (designed as ¾ but can be worked as sleeveless) is easily adjustable. 

The mosaic pattern on front continues growing through the lower body towards back, creating an exclusive shape. 

And – yay – it is possible to choose from the two options of the mosaic stitch pattern: Diamonds or Zigzags! Or you can combine both if you wish. 

Vilia Sweater comes in eight sizes: XS (S, M, L, XL, 2X, 3X, 4X) 

To fit actual bust: 86.4 (91.4, 96.5, 101.6, 106.7, 111.8, 116.8, 123) cm/ 34 (36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) in 

Finished bust: 93 (97, 105, 109, 117, 123, 127, 133) cm/ 36 ½ (38 ¼, 41 ¼, 43, 46, 48 ½, 50, 52 ¼) in.

Fine fingering yarn is recommended for this project. I used Scheepjes Whirlette for all my three samples. It is a cotton blend, and it comes in many tasteful colors. 

To complete the sweater, you will need: 

Yarn A (sleeveless version): 2 (2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4) cakes 

Yarn A (¾ sleeves version): 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4) cakes 

Yarn B (mosaic): 1 (1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2) cakes 

Please, note that you might need more yarn depending on your crochet style, or if you choose to make your sweater longer and wider. 

You can have a look at all Whirlette colors and order yarn in your local Scheepjes shop, or via online retailers: Wool Warehouse* and Black Sheep Wools* (both in UK, international shipping), Caro’s Atelier* (NL and Europe), Taemombo (US and Canada), Yarn Addicted (US). 

And here I would like to add, that gauge is extremely important for this project. Both for the width and for the height. If your gauge is off, the yoke will not grow proportionally as needed, and the fit will be different. 

I have made three samples in different color combinations and with different length of the sleeves. 

This brownish sweater was made with shades 893 Baklava for main color and 881 Yummy for mosaic (Zigzag, ¾ sleeves). 

Another sample was made with 874 Pomegranate for main color and 889 Sage for mosaic (Diamonds, short sleeves, and I am modelling it with a jean oversized shirt). 

And the last sample was actually the first I made. It uses Woolly Whirlette in shade 573 Bubble Gum for the main color, and the leftovers from a Whirl in shade 755 Blueberry Bambam (Diamonds, short sleeves). But I don’t recommend choosing big Whirl cakes for this project, as lots of yarn will be left. 

And here is a gallery of masterpieces finished by our wonderful testers team: 

Laura Jackson, Lisa Marlow, Esther Schippers, Elizabeth Kalka, Ruth Bracey, Taylor O'Shea, Sandra Veneman and Macarena Marskell.

 

The Vilia Sweater pattern is available on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE with a 25% off through Monday, May 31st, 2021. The price is discounted already, and no codes are needed.

If you would like to see more of my garment designs, including mosaic, you can find them on Ravelry HERE

Hope you enjoy!

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.

 


 

Furry Squares Blanket: free crochet pattern



The first project in my furry series is here, and I named it a Furry Squares Blanket. My idea was to find a fast and easy way of working with furry yarn in crochet. No wonder that fur is not the easiest material to crochet with as it is hard (or impossible) to see the stitches because of the massive fluff. And an adventure which should give relaxation and joy turns into headache and unravelling. But I have found a way. My new pattern is all about chains and spaces. It is much easier to see and feel them. And a combination with non-fluffy yarn for the border helps to count the rows without a problem. 

The Furry Squares blanket pattern comes in two versions. If you are not confident yet, try a plain option with just one color of the fluffy yarn. Or add stripes. 

And if you want to dive right into the squares and intarsia crochet, it is suggested that you first practice with the non-fluffy yarn to make sure you understand the idea of color changes and stitch placement. 

Hope you enjoy!

 ****************

FURRY SQUARES BLANKET pattern

 

Copyright. An original Lilla Björn Crochet Design (Tatsiana Kupryianchyk). Copyright 2014-2021. All rights reserved. This pattern is for personal use only. It cannot be sold, redistributed, or edited in any way. Translations and video tutorials are not allowed. You can sell your finished products, but you cannot use my pictures to promote them. Please, always credit me as a designer of this pattern. Thank you! 

Purchase a ready-to-print and ads-free pdf on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE. The file includes all instructions, pattern notes and progress pictures.

Abbreviations (US terms) 

CC contrast color 

ch chain stitch 

lp(s) loop(s) 

rep repeat 

sp(s) space(s) 

st(s) stitch(es) 

yo yarn over the hook 

hdc (half double crochet): yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a lp, yo, pull through all three lps. 

sc (single crochet): insert hook in indicated stitch, yo, draw up a lp, yo and pull through both lps on hook. 

Pattern repeats 

[…] rep instruction inside […] as many times as indicated in the pattern. 

*…; rep instruction after * as many times as indicated in the pattern. 

MATERIALS

Colorway 1

Scheepjes Chunky Monkey (CC): 1099 Mid Grey x 3 balls 

Scheepjes Furry Tales 

Yarn A: 978 Cinderella x 3 balls 

Yarn B: 985 Little Pig x 3 balls 

Yarn C: 970 Snow White x 3 balls 

Yarn D: 988 Aladdin x 3 balls

Yarn E: 983 Tinkerbell x 3 balls 

Colorway 2

Scheepjes Chunky Monkey (CC): 1302 Air Force Blue x 3 balls 

Scheepjes Furry Tales 

Yarn A: The Beast x 5 balls 

Yarn B: 977 Beauty x 8 balls 

Yarn C: 978 Cinderella x 3 balls 

Furry Tales yarn is available in your local Scheepjes shops and also via online retailers: Wool Warehouse* and Black Sheep wools (UK, international shipping),  Caro's Atelier* (NL, Europe), Taemombo (US and Canada).

6 mm crochet hook, stitch markers

Gauge: 23 sts x 17 rows to measure approx. 20 x 20cm/ 8 x 8” with hdc and 6 mm hook  

Measurements: approx. 110 x 150 cm/ 43 ¼ x 59in

PATTERN NOTES

This blanket is worked in intarsia crochet with all 6 colors used for every row. First the bottom band of the blanket is worked with Chunky Monkey. Then the first row of colorful squares is worked. 

Take two boxes and place them on both sides of you. 

To begin, put all balls in the right box. Move working Chunky Monkey ball (CC) to the left box and work the first five stitches. Then drop CC on the back of work, change to the first fur color in the last yarn over (a small float will appear on the working side), move the working fur ball to the left box and crochet the first row of the first square. 

When the row for the first square is finished, drop current yarn on the back side of work, change to the next fur color in the last yarn over, move the new ball to the left box and continue working with the new color. Continue doing the same for all colors moving balls one after another to the left box. 

After you turn work at the end of the row, all yarns will appear on the right side. And again, after changing the colors you will drop them on the back and move the balls from the left box back to the right box (small floats of yarn will again appear at the working side - they will be hidden by the fluff). Turn work after every row alternating clockwise and anticlockwise directions. It will help to keep all yarns untangled. 

TIP: to easily find the beginning and end of each fur square, use stitch markers to mark first and last fur sc on each square and move markers up as you progress. 

Photo credit: Laura Jackson


INSTRUCTIONS for squared blanket 

 

Bottom band

Row 1 (RS and WS are not important for this pattern): With first ball of CC. Ch132, 1hdc in third ch from hook, 1hdc in each ch to end, turn – 130 sts 

Row 2: Ch2 (does not count as a st here and throughout), 1hdc in each st to end, turn. 

Rows 3-4: Rep Row 2. 

Colorful Squares

TIP: For easy row count, mark any hdc on the first row of each row with squares. See the color scheme below for placement of colors 

Row 5: Ch2, 5hdc, change to fur color in last yo (drop CC on the back and move it to the left box), *1sc, ch2, skip 1 st, 1sc, [ch3, skip 2 sts, 1sc] x7 changing to next fur color in last yo of the last sc (drop prev fur color on the back side and move the ball to the left box); rep from * 4 more times changing to second ball of CC in the last color change, 5hdc with CC, turn. 

Row 6: Ch2, 5hdc with CC, change to next fur color in last yo, *1sc in next fur sc, ch2, 1sc in next ch3-sp, [ch3, 1sc in next ch3-sp] x6, ch3, miss next fur sc and ch2-sp, 1sc in last fur sc changing to next fur color; rep from * 4 more times changing to CC in the last color change, 5hdc with CC, turn. 

Rows 7-21: Rep Row 6. Cut all fur yarns leaving approx. 20 cm/8in tail for weaving. For every next row of colorful squares, repeat Row 6 seventeen times. Do not forget to mark the first hdc on the first row for easy counting. When all rows with colorful squares are finished, work a top band. 

 

Top band

Next row: With CC only, ch2, 5hdc, *[1sc in next fur sc, 2sc in next ch3-sp] x7, 1sc in next fur sc, 1sc in next ch2-sp, 1sc in last fur sc; rep from * 4 more times, 5hdc to end, turn – 130 sts 

Then repeat Row 2 from the bottom band three times and fasten off. Weave in all tails. 

LAYOUT

Colorway 1 

Colorway 1

 

INSTRUCTIONS for plain blanket 

Bottom band 

Row 1 (RS and WS are not important for this pattern): With first ball of CC. Ch134, 1hdc in third ch from hook, 1hdc in each ch to end, turn – 132 sts 

Row 2: Ch2 (does not count as a st here and throughout), 1hdc in each st to end, turn. 

Rows 3-4: Rep Row 2. Fur body TIP: For easy row count, mark any hdc on the first row of each row with squares. 

Row 5: Ch2, 5hdc, change to fur yarn in last yo (drop CC on the back and move it to the left box), *1sc, ch2, skip 1 st, 1sc, [ch3, skip 2 sts, 1sc] rep to last 5 sts changing to second ball of CC in last yo, 5hdc to end with CC, turn. 

Row 6: Ch2, 5hdc with CC, change to fur yarn in last yo, *1sc in next fur sc, ch2, 1sc in next ch3-sp, [ch3, 1sc in next sp] rep to last fur sc and ch2-sp, ch3, miss last fur sc and ch2-sp, 1sc in last fur sc changing to CC, 5hdc with CC, turn. 

Repeat Row 6 until desired length of the blanket. Cut fur yarn leaving approx. 20 cm/8in tail for safe weaving. Proceed to top band. 

Photo credit: Loele van den Bergh

Top band 

Next row: With CC only, ch2, 5hdc, *[1sc in next fur sc, 2sc in next ch3-sp] rep to last ch2-sp, 1sc in next fur sc, 1sc in next ch2-sp, 1sc in last fur sc, 5hdc to end, turn – 132 sts 

Then repeat Row 2 from the bottom band three times and fasten off. Weave in all tails. 

Purchase a ready-to-print and ads-free pdf on Ravelry HERE and Etsy HERE. The file includes all instructions, pattern notes and progress pictures.

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.


Furry Blanket: reveal



Furry yarn is adorably soft and squishy. I do not know of anyone who would not be happy to climb under such a mountain of cosiness. When touching gentle fluff, we, adults, are becoming kids again. The fluffy yarn provides an anti-stress effect, but working with it (especially, crocheting) can be a headache! 

My furry adventure is nearly finished! The blanket is hot off the hook, and it is only left to write down the pattern. As promised, there will be a super-fast and easy way to work with fluffy yarn. I did my best to create as easy to follow instructions as possible. 

The pattern will come in two versions. 

One is for the squared pattern in intarsia crochet. I have chosen 5 colors of Scheepjes Furry Tales for my own blanket and worked with 7 different skeins at the same time. 

And another version will be a simple and straightforward as-you-go blanket. Either done in one solid color, or in stripes. 

Here is an example of what Loele van den Bergh has made with two colors of Furry Tales: 976 Buttons (10 skeins) and 983 Tinkerbell (5 skeins) (with three skeins of Chunky Monkey 2005 Navy).

My version is more for the kids I guess, with a mix of pink, purple and green (and neutrals). I used three skeins of furry Tales in each of 5 colors: 970 Snow White, 985 Little Pig, 983 Tinkerbell, 978 Cinderella and 988 Aladdin (with three skeins of Chunky Monkey 1099 Mid Grey). 

And Laura Jackson decided to create a calm version with 977 Beauty, 978 Cinderella and 980 The Beast (and three skeins of Chunky Monkey 1302 Air Force Blue). 

Furry Tales yarn is available in your local Scheepjes shops and also via online retailers: Wool Warehouse* and Black Sheep wools (UK, international shipping),  Caro's Atelier* (NL, Europe), Taemombo (US and Canada).

This blanket will be the first in my “furry series”. In all excitement, I have already started to work on something new! And it is going very well. 

See you soon!

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.

 



Labyrinth Blanket make-a-long



Grab a cup of tea or coffee, and today I will tell you a story. Once upon a time (and I seriously do not remember when exactly it happened… a few years ago…) I was checking my Ravelry group for new messages, and there was a comment from someone called @taemombo

Colour Crafter version made by Faye Pike

Laura sounded overly excited about her idea about turning several of my mandala designs into octagons, and joining them together into a blanket. She was talking about mandalas with different stitch counts on the last rounds, and I was not sure how it all was possible. 

Laura did not post any pictures; she was just sharing her thoughts. And I wanted to support her in some way, though I had absolutely no idea and no complete picture of what she was going to do. I also thought the blanket might turn a bit stiff, as I made my own mandalas with cotton yarn and a small hook. I could not imagine them as elements for a blanket. But what I also learned – never say no to a new idea, because in fact you do not know in advance if it works or not. Try and see. 

And Laura tried. 

Colour Crafter version made by Faye Pike

After a few months, her blanket was revealed. And that was a WOW moment. Incredibly beautiful! She used DK yarn and everything turned out to be very drapey. 

The blanket was a combination of my mandalas and patterns from another designer. If I am not mistaken, five patterns were used in total… 

We shared her pictures on Facebook and Instagram, and there was a huge response. Lots of people were asking for a make-a-long to be able to complete the blanket together with co-crocheters, with advice and support. Because there were so many patterns involved, and the entire preparation for such a MAL seemed scary to me, we put this idea to sleep for a while. 

But after last year’s success with Sunny Blanket MAL, we thought that was the right time to come back to Labyrinth Blanket again. And here it is in all its glory! With huge thanks to Laura and Faye Pike for creating gorgeous sample blankets!

Stone Washed version made by Laura Jackson

What is a Labyrinth Blanket and where to find the patterns 

Labyrinth blanket is a combination of three patterns: Labyrinth Mandala, Joana’s Mandala and All Spring Flowers patterns.  

You have two options: either to buy all patterns separately (in case you already own one or both mandala patterns, for example). Or you can purchase a complete bundle of ALL THREE patterns for Labyrinth Blanket at a special price on my website HERE. The bundle includes everything you need to know.

Both mandalas are my older patterns. And they are available as stand-alone patterns in my shops on Ravelry and Etsy: Joana’s Mandala on Etsy, Joana’s Mandala on Ravelry, Labyrinth Mandala on Etsy, Labyrinth Mandala on Ravelry. 

All Spring Flowers sample square (Scheepjes Stone Washed)

And All Spring Flowers pattern is a new one! You can either purchase it as a part of a bundle mentioned above, or as a stand-alone pattern exclusively on my website HERE or Ravelry HERE (in case you don't want to attempt a huge Labyrinth blanket, for example). The pattern includes joining elements (squares, side triangles, corners and border), which will make a beautiful blanket itself. In any size! And you can use up scraps of yarn from your stash for that one. 

Here is an example of what five squares with side triangles can make. I would stitch this square onto a ready pillowcase to make a new cushion for my sofa. Please, note that the pattern does not include exact yarn amounts, as you can make as many joining elements as you wish.

All Spring Flowers sample square (Scheepjes Stone Washed)

By the way, All Spring Flowers pattern also includes a tutorial (together with detailed color key) on how to make a gorgeous baby blanket with a Scheepjes Stone Washed/River Washed mini colour pack. You will also need 12 x50g balls of Stone Washed or River Washed yarn in one solid color. The wonderful sample you see below was created by Laura, and she chose Crystal Quartz as background color. 

All Spring Flowers baby blanket made by Laura Jackson (Scheepjes Stone Washed and River Washed mini colour pack and Crystal Quartz for background)

 Look at all those tiny cuties in progress? Aren't they the loveliest little things? I am pretty sure Laura had lots of fun playing with them. And she also wrote a complete recipe for colors, if you would like to re-create her blanket. Or you can combine the colors according to your own taste.
 
Photo credit: Laura Jackson
 

YARN and Materials 

Labyrinth Blanket was designed in one colorway using Scheepjes Stone Washed (luxury version) and Colour Crafter (budget version) yarns. We have tried to choose similar colors so that both versions look almost the same. Please, note that exact yardages will depend on your gauge and style of crochet, and you might need more yarn to complete the blanket.

You can purchase complete yarn packs from Laura at Taemombo yarn shop for US and Canada (you will also receive a complete bundle of all patterns for Labyrinth Blanket from Laura as a gift). Or you can find individual balls of yarn in your local Scheepjes stores and via online retailers: 

Wool Warehouse* (UK, international shipping), Caro’s Atelier* (NL, Europe). 

DISCLOSURE: The links marked with * are affiliate. I might be compensated with a tiny amount from purchases made via these links with no extra costs for you. Thank you for support! 

Stone Washed version made by Laura Jackson

Stone Washed version

801 Moonstone x 21 balls 

802 Smokey Quartz x 6 balls 

805 Blue Apatite x 3 balls 

811 Deep Amethyst x 5 balls 

813 Amazonite x 2 balls 

818 Lilac Quartz x 3 balls 

828 Laminar x 4 balls 

Colour Crafter version made by Faye Pike

 Colour Crafter version 

1005 Barneveld x 9 balls 

1067 Hoorn x 2 balls 

1099 Wolvega x 3 balls 

1302 Dokkum x 2 balls 

1432 Heerelen x 2 balls 

1725 Ameland x 2 balls 

1820 Goes x 1 ball 

Finished size (after blocking): 

Stone Washed: approx. 140 cm/55 ¼ in 

Colour Crafter: approx. 160 cm/63in 

Material list: 

~ 3 mm and 3.5 mm hook for Stone Washed 

~ 3.5 mm and 4 mm hook for Colour Crafter 

~ Stitch markers, scissors, blocking tools, yarn needle to weave in ends 

Stone Washed version made by Laura Jackson

 

Make-a-Long 

If you’d like to make Labyrinth Blanket but not sure if you can cope with the patterns on your own, or if you prefer to crochet large projects together with someone, I would like to invite you to my group on Facebook where an informal make-a-long for Labyrinth will be hosted. 

If you are not a member of the group yet, please join it and don’t forget to answer a simple question at the check-out. Without this answer your application will be automatically rejected. 

We will begin on April 30th, 2021, so hopefully you will have enough time to get ready with the yarn and other materials. 

Colour Crafter version made by Faye Pike

There will be no strict dates and no rush. Because you will have all complete patterns at once, you can work at your own path and ask questions when you are stuck with the pattern. I hope this make-a-long will be a very relaxed one, and that it will also give you time to work on other wips at the same time (and I bet you have lots of them now). 

Stone Washed version made by Laura Jackson

I hope this blog post answered all your questions about Labyrinth Blanket make-a-long. See you soon! 

Subscribe to a newsletter not to miss a single post. You can also follow me on FacebookPinterest and Instagram.

 

© LillaBjörn's Crochet World. Design by MangoBlogs.